Tag Archives: art

Portrait of Dan

I finished this in February, but have only just got round to making this short film.

It’s just a selection of stills taken of me painting a portrait in acrylic on canvas. I was trying out some techniques I’d not used before – like a mid grey undercoat as Holbein used when painting The Ambassadors. I thought I might try letting the base coat show through in some of the highlighting. But as it turned out I painted over practically all the surface.

Also I’d been looking at polychrome work and Estofado – the process of layering of gold leaf and then paint particularly on sculptures made of wood. They would reveal the gold leaf by scratching the top layer of paint off. The polychromer can scratch or scrape the design off the reveal the gold underneath.

As well as scratching it off I’d heard the gold leaf was used under paintings to help make the painting itself glow – especially the flesh tones. So I  tried that too. I think it did work. There was a finish to the facial area that felt more vibrant. The final picture. Click on it to get a close up of the detail.

Dan: portrait in acrylic

Video Music: Daydream by Danny Sharp

Tell me what you think.

Pop Art – a Presidential Gift

Much comment has been made about the appropriateness of gifts between state leaders. Poor president Obama’s department got it so wrong with the lovely Mr Brown, that the sequel was being scrutinised with much interest. And low, it was modern art that won out.Ed Ruscha by Gary Regester

I’m quite pleased about that. There’s always the risk that someone will play it safe with an older, classic  piece by a more established name and then the ‘gift with value’ card will have  been seen to be played. (a bit like Mr Brown’s very politically correct Victorian timbers from an anti-slavery ship, pen holder). But dealing the modern art card is definitely more peppy, risky and shows a good deal of faith in the value of modern artists. Obama gave Cameron a signed colour lithograph by American artist Ed Ruscha, one of leaders of the Pop art movement. Continue reading Pop Art – a Presidential Gift

Caravaggio and Camera Obscura

CaravaggioArtistic genius Caravaggio, used a primitive form of photography to help create his masterpieces, said two art experts, Susan Grundy and Roberta Lapucci.  Their research at a workshop in Florence, revealed that Caravaggio probably converted his entire studio into a camera obscura in order to project images onto his canvas. The painter then used his own compound made of mercury, salt and Venetian ceruse, a popular lead-based cosmetic skin-lightener, in order to temporarily ”fix” the images on the canvas. This produced a short-lived, fluorescent image, similar to a photograph, which he was then able to convert into a permanent sketch that formed the basis of the eventual painting. Continue reading Caravaggio and Camera Obscura

Roy Lichtenstein at Museum Ludwig

Conversation by Roy LichtensteinRoy Lichtenstein – Kunst als Motiv (Art as Motive) is a collection of about a hundred pieces which reflect his interpretation of other great modern pieces with a Lichtenstein twist. He uses his flat palate of bold colours and outlines and his now famous cartoon shadings with benday dots and blobs to break up the images and create his own slant on masters such as Picasso, Monet, Matisse, Mondrian and Dalí.
This exhibition at the Museum Ludwig in Cologne runs from 2nd July until 3rd October 2010.

Female Pop Art Artists

Ampersand IV by Chryssa 1965Seductive Subversion –  the name of the exhibition at the University of the Arts earlier on this year, shows a different, less commercial side to Pop Art – mainly because it’s all produced by women. These pieces are observant, pithy and quirky, and were  overlooked at the time because of their glamorous male peacock counterparts. This exhibition wishes to redress this imbalance and celebrate a wider definition of the Pop Art Movement.

It was the first exhibition of female Pop Art and is now to be seen, I believe, at Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, although I can’t see it on their web site as yet.

This Times Square inspired ‘Ampersand IV’, is a stylized neon ampersand in a Plexiglas cube by Chryssa, one of the first artists to utilize neon in her work in 1965. Continue reading Female Pop Art Artists

Banksy Prints Stolen

Banksy Museum pieceIf you’ve seen Banksy’s book, Wall and Piece, you will have witnessed several examples of Banksy’s art being surreptitiously placed on the walls of famous galleries and museums.

This example, ‘Early Man Goes To Market’  appeared in The British Museum in 2005 and was completely overlooked until Banksy pointed it out on his website. All credit to the Museum staff for recognising man’s need for making marks and it being seen by the largest possible audience. It is now in their permanent collection.

I’m sure this drew a wry smile from the artist himself.

I wonder if the recent reversal of fortunes of Banksy’s work from Art Republic did the same. Probably did. Two Banksy prints were stolen by a man and woman from the shop in central London. And this is not the first time this has happened with Art Republic. Apparently, 10 prints were stolen from  the same company, only in Brighton. Tut, tut, Art Republic – very clumsy. Continue reading Banksy Prints Stolen

Encaustic Painting

Fayum Lady 100ADPeter Sinai-600ADHad never heard of this! A very old and intermittently re-found technique which uses bees wax and pigments to paint or model paint with. The bees wax has to be heated so it can be manipulated. It seems it was first used for Egyptian mummies – but looking at the style of these paintings – with a more Romanesque style.

People near

Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts

will be able to see demonstrations of this strange technique at their Arts Festival this weekend.